short words by bob ant

As Summer comes to a close – but not daylight saving – we have another Narooma Rotary Markets under our belt. For a while it looked as if we were going to be down on numbers and then I had a flashback to a movie “build it and they will come”. On Sunday Rotarian’s and friends of Rotary came out of the proverbial woodwork and we had good numbers. David and Rachael joined with Laurelle to control the gate. Michael helped Frank with marking out and then made smoooooth smoothies and freeessssh juice all day, with a little help. Bob Aston and John Doyle assisted by Angie made Donuts and it was great to see Peter Hartley at the BBQ. Fred Fawke from Canberra (Mr ShelterBox) and Pam cooked, Joan and Rob, John and Sandra Doyle and my wonderful partner in grime Merinda. Rolfe assisted as time permitted (definitely well appreciated coffee) and to anyone I may have missed a huge thank you.

Last Thursday night was climate change… this Thursday night is a club assembly on change of another sort. Please feel free to put your two bob’s worth in.  Fred Fawke will also give us an update ion ShelterBox and Fuji.

Following this week’s meeting is a board meeting…. all members are allowed to sit in and watch if you want or take an early mark.

It was an enormous pleasure to recognise the work of Past President Angie with a Paul Harris Fellow award. Our charity, the Rotary Foundation allows for a PHF to be given as a recognition for service to the Rotary family and local, national and international community. In front of a large audience Angie was formally recognised for her service, well done and well deserved.

A question for this Thursday night…. Do you remember Eddie the Eagle?

I hope a lot of magic comes your way this week……. Girls…. Did you pop the question?????

Cheers
Bob

Beacon 3rd March 2016

short words by bob ant

As Summer comes to a close – but not daylight saving – we have another Narooma Rotary Markets under our belt. For a while it looked as if we were going to be down on numbers and then I had a flashback to a movie “build it and they will come”. On Sunday Rotarian’s and friends of Rotary came out of the proverbial woodwork and we had good numbers. David and Rachael joined with Laurelle to control the gate. Michael helped Frank with marking out and then made smoooooth smoothies and freeessssh juice all day, with a little help. Bob Aston and John Doyle assisted by Angie made Donuts and it was great to see Peter Hartley at the BBQ. Fred Fawke from Canberra (Mr ShelterBox) and Pam cooked, Joan and Rob, John and Sandra Doyle and my wonderful partner in grime Merinda. Rolfe assisted as time permitted (definitely well appreciated coffee) and to anyone I may have missed a huge thank you.

Last Thursday night was climate change… this Thursday night is a club assembly on change of another sort. Please feel free to put your two bob’s worth in.  Fred Fawke will also give us an update ion ShelterBox and Fuji.

Following this week’s meeting is a board meeting…. all members are allowed to sit in and watch if you want or take an early mark.

It was an enormous pleasure to recognise the work of Past President Angie with a Paul Harris Fellow award. Our charity, the Rotary Foundation allows for a PHF to be given as a recognition for service to the Rotary family and local, national and international community. In front of a large audience Angie was formally recognised for her service, well done and well deserved.

A question for this Thursday night…. Do you remember Eddie the Eagle?

I hope a lot of magic comes your way this week……. Girls…. Did you pop the question?????

Cheers
Bob

Climate Change – a Humanitarian Crisis

Rotary has a strong focus on humanitarian issues. Malaria for example kills 600,000 people each year, and we feel strongly about finding solutions.

But climate change kills up to 10 times as many as malaria, 4.5 million people each year.  The report, Climate Change Kills More People Than Terrorism  which came up with that number, included the effects of extreme weather, droughts and floods,  food security, nutrition, and water safety, and most importantly the health effects of pollution due to the burning of fossil fuels.  The economic cost of malaria is about $12 billion, while the same report lists the economic cost of climate change at 1 trillion dollars.

So, if malaria is an issue that Rotary cares about, then climate change should be also.

Rotary has a positive agenda, we are not lobbyists and protesters, we do stuff –  but the challenge is to work out what to do. And that is the challenge which our guest speaker Dr Karin Geiselhart spoke to.  What can community groups do?

The opportunity to help the arts council put 10 kW of panels on the roof of the cinema is a good example of what’s possible. Our contribution of $5,000 was for about a third of the cost of the system, and our bit will result in a saving of about $40,000 over 25 years (One third of 40kWhrs per day, x 365 x 25 at  33c per kWhr).

Eight times what we put in. That’s a win to the local community.

And the system has a double benefit – it will make a substantial contribution in the fight against climate change, avoiding 180 tonnes of CO2 over it’s lifetime, that’s more than 100,000 cubic metres.  To visualise that much CO2, imagine, a 3m square (about the size of a bedroom). Now build walls on each side of that square right up into space beyond the atmosphere.  Now swap out the air and replace with CO2, that’s the quantity we are talking about.

So there’s a win that will benefit everyone, not just the people of Narooma.

We killed two birds with one stone, a local benefit and a global one.  The challenge for an organisation like ours is to find projects like this that maximize the benefits for each dollar and especially to find projects that have a recurring benefit for decades to come.

Solar on the Cinema

Rotary presents cheque for $5,000 for 10kW system on the Narooma Cinema
Rotary presents cheque for $5,000 for 10kW system on the Narooma Cinema

Climate Change – Dr Karin Geiselhart

Our speaker this week was Karin Geiselhart, who spoke to us about  “Adapting to climate change – where science and ethics meet”.

Karin started by reminding us of some of the predictions made by the IPCC, many of which are being felt already in the form of extreme weather events.  These in turn have a humanitarian and an economic cost experienced to a much greater degree by the developing world and the poorest communities – and these are the very people that many Rotary programs are designed to help.

“Risks are unevenly distributed and are generally greater for disadvantaged people and communities in countries at all levels of development”

Further out, the affects will likely be very grim indeed.  Karin pointed out the last time CO2 levels  were as high as they are now ( 400ppm) was millions of years ago, a time not very suitable for humans.  Even a small rise in sea level would disproportionately affect the poorest people, indeed most of the worlds major cities are close to sea level.

Karin spoke about sustainable development goals, so many of them are in line with the objectives of Rotary projects

  1. No poverty
  2. Zero Hunger
  3. Good Health and Well-Being
  4. Quality education
  5. Gender Equality
  6. Clean water and sanitation
  7. Affordable and clean energy
  8. Decent work and economic growth
  9. Industry, innovation and infrastructure
  10. Reduced inequalities
  11. Sustainable cities and communities
  12. Responsible consumption and production
  13. Climate Action
  14. Life below water
  15. Life on land
  16. Peace, justice and strong institutions
  17. Partnerships for the goals

A lively discussion followed Karin’s talk. A good point was raised about losses on the Electricity Grid – which are roughly proportional to the distance between generator and consumer.  Since we are a fair way from most generators, the losses here on the South Coast are higher than elsewhere, making every solar installation here even more effective.

Ang presented with Paul Harris Fellow Award

President Bob presents Paul Harris Fellow Award to Ang Ulrichsen
President Bob presents Paul Harris Fellow Award to Ang Ulrichsen

111th Rotary Birthday

President Bob blows out the candles on 111th Rotary Birthday Cake
President Bob blows out the candles on 111th Rotary Birthday Cake

Position Vacant

Due to the Newsletter Editor being in a wife free zone ( woops that should be a wifi free zone), the last two newsletters didn’t quite make it to the printing press.  This could have been prevented by having an Assistant Newsletter Editor, so please don’t hesitate to step forward.

 

Many a sinner has played himself into Heaven on the Trombone

This weeks quizz:      What is weird about this photo?

 

 

Short words by bob ant

A busy week for Rotary is underway. On Wednesday evening I attended Moruya for a combined Club Meeting to acknowledge the hard work of the Rotarian’s , the Moruya Jockey Club and the community as we presented the proceeds of the Rotary Race Day to Deputy Mayor and Chair of Moruya Cancer Carers  Councillor Rob Pollock.

The cheques totalled more than $15,000 and took the donation to Cancer Carers to more than $51,000 in three years, – an outstanding effort. This would not be possible without the many dedicated people who worked so hard to bring it all together. Special mention goes to Vere Grey President of Batemans Bay Club,  Mike Cowden from the Moruya Jockey Club, and our own Laurelle Pacey for the great PR effort. It was a pleasure to chair the meeting.

Last night at our regular meeting, we postponed a discussion on donuts until the next Club Assembly and Board Meeting in two weeks time, due to members being away and time for some members to gather extra information.  I was the guest speaker to try to clear up some of the confusion about when you can take a photograph and when you need permission to use it. I hope the information was helpful.

This weekend is PETS (President Elect Training) in Canberra and Mike and I are off to be enlightened. As an Assistant District Governor I must also attend.

On Tuesday, all are welcome to join with us outside the SoArt Gallery in Narooma to cut a cake for Rotary’s 111th Birthday and present a cheque for $5,000 toward the cost of Solar Panels on the Kinema. If you are able, please join with me in our celebration for this great project.

Next Thursday, Dr Karin Geiselhart discusses Rotary’s response to Climate Change. Really looking forward to this and please feel free to invite partners, friends and anyone you know who wants to learn more about this area of Science.

Following on is our Markets. We have some blanks in the roster which need filling. Please call John Doyle if you can make it and haven’t put your name down.

That’s all for now, have a great weekend.

Bob

How to do PDFs

Use the following to embed a PDF

<iframe style=”width: 718px; height: 900px;” src=”http://docs.google.com/gview?url=https://www.naroomarotary.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/James-Bond-Spectre.pdf&embedded=true” width=”300″ height=”150″ frameborder=”0″>
</iframe>

or possibly:

James-Bond-Spectre

 

Beacon 11th February 2016

Narooma helps Cambodia’s tip kids

 

Saturday’s afternoon tea to raise funds to support the Rotary Cambodia Dental Team Project led by our very own Charmaine White was a huge success, thanks largely to the generosity of Michael O’Connor and Donna.

Charmaine is leading the five-member team which will spend 14 days in May treating children living on the rubbish dumps around Cambodia’s capital Phnom Penh.

‘The problem is huge,’ she said. ‘A couple of thousand of the country’s poorest families scavenge an existence on the tips.

‘There’s now a school there and we’ll initially treat the kids through the school.

‘Our main task will be to get these children out of pain.’

The team will use an existing dental clinic set up by Australian dentist Robert Ogle who spends two weeks a month in Phnom Penh and two weeks at his Gympie practice, as well as his translators.

‘We’ll use the funds raised in Narooma to buy the disposable things we need, like needles, anaesthetics, filling material, gauze,’ she said.

‘We’ll buy them here and carry them over and leave anything left over for the clinic.’

Some of the money raised will also be used to transport kids in from the tip in tuk tuks.

The team also consists of Narooma dental assistant Sharon White, Rotarians from the Gold Coast dental hygienist Sharyn Tagahoade and Hilda Resburn, and German dentist Marlene Schulz.

All team members pay their own airfares and living expenses.

Michael and Donna were delighted Saturday’s afternoon tea raised $1,654 ‘which far exceeded our expectations’. They generously opened up their home and supplied the food and refreshments.

‘Together with $630 donated largely by Bluewater Dragons members before the day, and a whip around at the Rotary Christmas Party, that makes a total of $2,585 so far,’ he said.

‘Everyone has been great – the Dragonboat people, RFS members, the Numnutz, staff and clients of Narooma Dental Surgery and other friends, as well as Narooma Rotarians.’

Further fundraisers will be held in March.

 

 

2016-02-07 Rotary - Cambodia 005

 

Rotary Cambodia Project 5

Afternoon tea hosts Donna Anderson and Michael O’Connor, left, with Narooma dentist and Rotarian Charmaine White, her dental assistant Sharon White, and Narooma Rotary president Bob Antill at the Rotary afternoon tea fundraiser for the Rotary Cambodia Dental Team project.

 

John, Rod and Peter
John, Rod and Peter

Short words by bob ant

Today (Saturday 6th Feb) we had a wonderful afternoon of fellowship to raise money for Charmaine’s Cambodian trip. Our wonderful hosts were Michael and Donna with Michael cooking up a storm and many others helping out.

Michael and Donna opened up their house and provided everything so that all moneys raised went to Charmaine’s most worthy cause.  Thank you to Michael and Donna and to all who attended.

The large earthquake in Taiwan saw lots of damage but Radar’s family and Kayla (the outbound student from Bega who is staying with Radar’s parents) are all safe and well. Kayla managed to sleep through the event. Our thoughts go out to the people who have been displaced through this disaster.

Many thanks to Angie who has again put together a great display of Narooma Rotary. It is important to get information out to the community about us by all means of media – Angie with great displays, Charmaine with face book, Frank with the Beacon and web site and Laurelle with our media releases to the paper and radio. Great effort everyone and much appreciated.

NEXT THURSDAY we are meeting at the Golden Palace Chinese Restaurant (next to O’Brien pub) to celebrate Chinese New Year.  BYO wine only $2.50 corkage – Beer and Soft drink available there. $25 per head . There will be red envelopes available to put small amounts in for Radar as a gift for Lunar New Year and extra spending money for his trip. As a Monkey I’m excited about this!!! Bring your partners and friends along but make sure you tell Anthony by Tuesday 5 pm so we can finalise numbers with the restaurant.

Our donation to the Solar Panel project for the Kinema roof will be handed over on the 23 which is Rotary’s 111 Birthday. We are giving the present.

Karin Geiselhart will be our guest speaker on the 25th. Karin is an expert on Climate Change and not only an interesting speaker but also a person who can answer your questions. Not only a partners night but invite 10 friends.

“May the grass growth slow this week and you all have some magic along the way”

Cheers
Bob

 

Shaping your future with Rotary

IMG_3303

‘Shaping your future with Rotary’ exhibition set up at Narooma High School this week highlighting the great Youth programs we sponsor. This is now the second year Angie has taken it to the school to showcase to promote Rotary at the start of the school year. Several teachers there this morning were keen to share this information with students.

Beacon 4th February 2016

Narooma youth broaden horizons

What a great night last week, our first meeting for 2016, when we heard from some talented local young people whom we sponsored on various programs to help them achieve their potential.

We also met Narooma Rotary Tertiary Scholarship winner Melanie Miller who intends studying for a Bachelor of Clinical Exercise Physiology at the University of New England, after a gap year this year.

We also heard from Jacob Read who recently spent a week on the Rotary leadership training course (RYLA) which he described as ‘life changing’. He has just completed a traineeship with Eurobodalla Shire Council

‘It was a fantastic opportunity where I initially found myself out of my comfort zone in some areas, such as public speaking,’ he said.

‘The speakers were inspiring and I have made some new friends. I highly recommend it.’

Our Youth Director Lynda Ord was delighted with Council’s response to RYLA and their support of Jacob.

Then Eden Brennan and Georgia Poyner, now in Year 10 at Narooma High, spoke about their three days at Macquarie University on the Conoco Phillips Science Experience.

‘One benefit was socializing with people our own age with similar interests and passions,’ Eden said. ‘Another was it gave us a taste of uni life and made the prospect of university less daunting and more appealing.’

Eden said it also encourages girls to consider a career in science, noting many lecturers they met were women.

Paris Blessington, also of Narooma High, had participated with three other students in the Model United Nations Assembly several months ago where they represented the views of the United Arab Emirates.

Largely as a result of their experiences, Narooma High has now formed a debating club.

 

Celebrating our Youth Night last week were Assistant Narooma Youth Director David McInnes, left, Eden Brennan (Conoco Phillips Science Experience), Jacob Read (RYLA), Melanie Miller (2016 Narooma Rotary Tertiary Scholarship winner), Paris Blessington (Model United Nations Assembly), Georgia Poyner (Conoco Phillips Science Experience), Narooma Youth Director Lynda Ord and Narooma Rotary President Bob Antill
Celebrating our Youth Night last week were Assistant Narooma Youth Director David McInnes, left, Eden Brennan (Conoco Phillips Science Experience), Jacob Read (RYLA), Melanie Miller (2016 Narooma Rotary Tertiary Scholarship winner), Paris Blessington (Model United Nations Assembly), Georgia Poyner (Conoco Phillips Science Experience), Narooma Youth Director Lynda Ord and Narooma Rotary President Bob Antill

Celebrating our Youth Night last week were Assistant Narooma Youth Director David McInnes, left, Eden Brennan (Conoco Phillips Science Experience), Jacob Read (RYLA), Melanie Miller (2016 Narooma Rotary Tertiary Scholarship winner), Paris Blessington (Model United Nations Assembly), Georgia Poyner (Conoco Phillips Science Experience), Narooma Youth Director Lynda Ord and Narooma Rotary President Bob Antill.

 

Afternoon Tea – Fantabulous Fundraiser

Afternoon Tea – Please Come!

You are invited to afternoon tea this Saturday, we are raising funds for our very own local Dentist Charmaine who is planning to provide dental services to young children in Cambodia in May this year.  Read about what life is like for the children who work at the Cambodian rubbish dump)

Michael and Donna are our hosts, it will all be happening this Saturday.
→ → → →  6th February 2.30 until 5.00 pm

Homemade scones and cream , a glass of bubbly or beer, tea and coffee and live music.

Where ?

→ → → →   At 153 Old Highway Narooma (First house after Flying Fox Road, follow the Bunting.)

All your donations go to help our
Rotary Cambodia Dental Team in May 2016

The time again:

→ → → →  6th February 2.30 until 5.00 pm

Now can you all do your part and come this Saturday with YOUR WALLET and as many friends you can persuade to come with you.

Remember all money collected goes to the dental  project in Cambodia; Michael and Donna will be providing the food and drink.

Last Saturday the Narooma Blue Water Dragon coach Lex Swaddling spontaneously announce a whip around for those not able to attend the afternoon tea and LO AND BEHOLD $144 was collected.

An amazing result that brought a great grin to Michaels face.

He has made blackberry jam from wild blackberries to go with the scones and cream. He will also have a collection of slices, cake etc.

If you have friends or contacts in LIONS, QUOTA, ZONTA, CWA, VIEW etc please ask them to come as they will be very welcome.  as I  feel as a club we should reach out to the other service clubs in Narooma . Choirs etc are in that category

There will be parking at Michaels place and across the road where indicated.

The first batch of scones will be out of the oven by 2.30 and Michael will keep baking until it is obvious no more is needed.

PLEASE TRY AND MAKE THIS A SUCCESS FOR CHARMAINE.

 

Eden Brennan – Conoco Phillips science experience

Hi,

My name is Eden Brennan and I am starting year 10 at Narooma high school tomorrow. Two weeks ago I spent three days at Macquarie University participating in the Conoco Phillips science experience.

The first day of the science experience, we assembled in the courtyard for registration. After the official introduction there was an ‘interactive science expo’ in the courtyard with university students or lecturers conducting experiments or demonstrating what their department does.

This ranged from 3D printers, aerial drones, simulating computer programs and microscopes to chemical reactions, explosions, puzzles and ‘goop’ to demonstrate molecular bonds. After a short break we found ourselves exploring the indigenous sciences. We learnt about ‘natural product chemistry’ and how that relates to bush medicines and bush tucker, we also built traditional stone axes.

To finish off an exhausting day we returned to the courtyard for a session of ‘career speed-dating’ which is exactly what it sounds like. Professors and lecturers from each department of the science faculty of Macquarie Uni sat behind a table and informed us of what they do, why they do it and how they got where they are today. We were then allowed to ask as many questions as we wanted and when the bell dinged we moved on. End day one.

Day two began much the same, registration at 8:30, though this time I had people to talk to and a couple of, I may venture to say, friends. Once everyone was assembled we were split into our groups again and participated in a range of activities run by 5th year chiropractic students. These activities explained the four key things that a chiropractor does. After the morning break we visited the museum where many fascinating biological specimens were on display, and listened to a talk on the importance of taxonomy. We then proceeded to the labs to conduct a water quality survey of the lake, creek and tap water on campus. After lunch we were led to a lecture theatre, complete with the tiny swing-out tables that I picture whenever I imagine university life, and listened to the lectures of Dr Emilie Ens (from department of environmental science), Professor Annabelle McIver (from department of computing) and associate professor Culum Brown (from department of biological sciences). I loved this activity because just a little bit as if I was actually at university I even took notes. To finish off day two we had an ‘YSA egg drop and tower build’. We were given an egg, 2m of masking tape and about 30 straws and in half an hour we had to construct a cage to protect our egg when we dropped it from various heights. We started off with a good idea but not enough materials and so failure was inevitable.

By the beginning of the final day everyone had made new friends and we no longer felt awkward as we waited for our first activity to begin. In the morning we had lectures from Drs in earth and planetary science and conservation biology which were fascinating to hear. We then proceeded to the labs for chemistry experiments which demonstrated various reactions between substances. We made nylon, played with dry ice and sodium hydroxide, observed exothermic and endothermic reactions and made slime (poly vinyl alcohol l+ sodium borate solution). The second part of our time in the labs continued with DNA extraction and jewellery making. I know, those two things don’t sound like they should go together but what we made was a beaded model of the Watson and Crick double Helix.

Then we extracted the DNA from a banana.

After a BBQ lunch supplied by rotary, we listened to lecturers from the astronomy and the chemistry departments. People from the chemistry and physics departments combined and performed a ‘science magic show’ for us. It was a little silly but lots of fun to watch and they explained the science behind everything they did. The science experience ended with a brief farewell and a “thank-you all for coming and we hope you enjoyed it” speech from one of the group leaders.

Why it is so important

There are a few reasons why university science experiences like this are so important for students our age. Number one, the big one, is the social benefits, especially coming from a small rural high school. It enabled us to socialise with people our own age who have similar interests and passions. Also experiences like this help forge new friendships and connections that can last for years. The second reason is that it gave us a taste of uni life. The lectures, the coffee, the enthusiasm for the pursuit of knowledge, and it presented an opportunity for us to see whether we liked the “vibe” of university or not. I loved it and Macquarie University is definitely on the cards for me.

The final reason why this experience was so enriching is that it may encourage this generation, particularly girls, to consider a career in science. It was encouraging for me to see that so many of the lecturers were women.

It is more important than ever for people to choose careers in science as Australia’s economic prosperity will not be able to rely on our rich natural resources forever and innovative technology will be needed for us to maintain our way of life.

So on behalf of myself and Georgia and our families I would like to thank you so much for sponsoring us, it was a really enjoyable, informative and wholly worthwhile experience. It made the prospect of university less daunting and so much more appealing.

Thank-you.